Dating in 1950 s

Back in the salads days of post World War II American, Kotex took it upon themselves to present young ladies with truly perplexing multiple choice dating advice ads.I've collected as many of them as I could find — all via the wonderful craptoy Flickr page, a page that contains 22 sets of over 5,000 unique vintage images, including well over 1,000 adverts.It started with falling birth rates in the early 20th century; whereas households of 10 children were the norm for previous generations, married couples began making a conscious choice to have smaller families.This eventually meant lax rules for teens: "These parents did not have to exercise the kind of severe discipline that had been needed to keep order in households of nine or ten," writes Weigel.To celebrate this Diamond Jubilee, relationship site e Harmony reviews how young couples met and dated sixty years ago and compares the advice given then, to our contemporary words of wisdom. Men frequently ask Whilst it’s still traditional for a man to ask, today women can and often do ask men on dates.

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They seemed — at least to this man's untrained not female, not-1950s eyes — to solve absolutely nothing.

But how did the young Princess know when she first met her dashing Duke that he was to be her life partner? It was not polite or acceptable for women to suggest an evening out together.

Were the customs of courtship in the 1940s and 1950s more successful in bringing lifelong couples together? With no answer machines or text messages in existence women would have to wait for a knock at the door or a telephone call.

The first women to date, many of whom were raised by ultra-proper Victorian mothers, risked jail time in doing so.

"In the eyes of the authorities," Weigel writes, "women who let men buy them food and drinks or gifts and entrance tickets looked like whores, and making a date seemed the same as turning a trick." reports that "petting" joined the national lexicon in the 1920s, later defined by sexologist Alfred Kinsey as "deliberately touching body parts above or below the waist," writes Weigel.

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